Edwin Feliciano Explains Five Things You Can Say When Someone Asks Why You’re Not Drinking

  Edwin Feliciano is the Behavioral Health Director at UCSB Student Health, so he understands that maintaining sobriety can be really difficult in high-risk situations. Although there are a number of sober activities that students can do while in school, he also knows that a lot of leisurely activities in college involve partying. It can be awkward for that newly sober person to explain why they’re not drinking if asked. You might want to work with a psychiatrist like Edwin Feliciano ┬áto come up with a strategy on how to handle these situations, but here are five things you can say to quickly diffuse the problem so you can get back to having fun. And always remember, in the majority of cases, nobody will care what is in your cup, so don’t be afraid that you’ll constantly have to explain yourself. I’m Driving: This is an easy one. Nobody will…

Could College Binge Drinking Be Discouraged by Stricter Parenting?

  According to one study outlined in a Huffington Post, the answer to this question is yes. As Behavioral Health Director at UCSB Student Health, Dr. Edwin Feliciano provides assistance to college students with a wide variety of addiction-related issues. Binge drinking affects people of all age, but it does have a disproportionate effect on college students.   The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism estimates that 40 percent of students binge drink and 25 percent of college students report that binge drinking has affected their academic studies in some capacity. It is a serious problem in universities today, but the problem may stem back to middle school or high school.   Children who are introduced to alcohol earlier are more likely to repeat the habit into their teens and twenties. The aforementioned study was from Loyola Marymount University, and it was published originally in the Psychology of Addictive…

Understanding the Risk Factors of Drugs and Alcohol for Incoming College Freshmen

College freshmen around the country are moving into their college dorms this week. As parents help them get settled and make sure they have the basics, they should also have a healthy and honest discussion with them about alcohol and drugs. It could help them realize some of the risks out there as they attempt to transition to college life.   The first week of school can be especially confusing for freshmen living on their own for the first time. Students could potentially have many different reactions to their newfound freedom. Some could get homesick. Others could decide to engage in more high-risk situations in order to fit in.   There was a PBS feature released several years ago on the potential risk factors that college freshmen face during the first few weeks of college. Although students today do binge drink less and have a healthier attitude towards alcohol than…